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The Towers

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COFFEE

Coffee from the Swiss agri-food industry is a prime example of innovation, as is the commitment of the public and private sectors which aim to ensure sustainability throughout the value chain of the sector, all the way from the plant to the coffee cup.

Swiss foreign trade statistics show that coffee has become the country’s top food product export, outstripping exports of chocolate and cheese by a long way.

Through its Nescafé project, Nestlé helps around 400,000 farmers in 14 countries worldwide, improving their quality of life and working conditions. It is also working constantly to ensure that the environmental footprint is reduced.

In Vietnam, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), in collaboration with the government and small producers, is working to reduce water consumption in the production of coffee.

Furthermore, in many countries of the world the SDC supports and promotes family-run farms to ensure they have secure access to land, and improved access to knowledge and to the market so that they can live a life free from hunger or poverty.

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APPLE

The apple rings come from traditional tall trees in Swiss orchards and represent biodiversity, the ability to diversify and the central role of agriculture in protecting the landscape. Apples are an essential part of a healthy and natural diet.

Most of the apple rings come from Jonagold apples – tall apple trees producing organic fruit which accounts for 10% of total output annually.

After the coffee tower – iconic product of the Swiss agri-food industry – comes the apple tower, showing the importance of agriculture in Switzerland. The apple also takes us back to the roots of Swiss history and the values of freedom embodied by William Tell.

Some numbers:

In Switzerland there are 2.3 million tall trees and there are 30,000 hectares planted with fruit trees.

50 tonnes of dried apples from the last few years’ harvests will fill the tower of apples.

420,000 sample bags for the tower will be prepared with the help of the Egnach & Mansio foundation workshops for people with disabilities.

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WATER

The theme of water as a vital resource is the central focus of the Swiss pavilion and represents a sustainable and responsible Switzerland.

The Gotthard massif is also called the “water tower of Europe”. In fact it is the source of four major European rivers: the Reuss, the Rhine, the Rhone and the Ticino, crossing and nourishing Europe before emptying into the North Sea and the Mediterranean. The Gotthard cantons (Graubünden, Ticino, Uri and Valais), the cradle of the Swiss Confederation, are veritable reservoirs for most of the countries of our continent.

82% of the Swiss water footprint is attributable to the consumption of water in foreign countries. Switzerland’s commitment to the protection, treatment and distribution of this resource is very strong: about CHF 200 million are invested annually by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs to enhance the value of water in economic activities and promote cross-border cooperation in the management of water resources at the international level.

The drinking water in one of the four towers is from the local water table and carries a message of awareness on the precious nature of this rare and limited resource, in Switzerland and around the world.

The tower is filled with goblets displaying a picture of the water cycle with a supporting slogan. Visitors will be able to help themselves to drinking water from the tower and then reuse the goblets elsewhere at Expo 2015 or at home.

This tower will show the general public the challenges linked to sustainable water management, one of the major challenges facing humankind in the 21st century.

The main messages are to remind us that water is a precious, vital resource and at the same time to show the various initiatives going on in the public and private sectors to ensure a durable and sustainable supply.

Water is the basis of all life.

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SALT

Salt taken from under the ground in Switzerland is an essential element in human nutrition as well as for industrial production. This tower allows us to show the general public the various initiatives that aim to reduce the excessive consumption of salt in industrialised countries and reduce nutritional deficiencies among populations of developing countries.

Currently salt consumption in Switzerland and throughout the rest of Europe is around 10g per day: this figure represents about twice the daily intake of 5g recommended by the WHO. Most of the salt that we consume comes from processed foods such as bread, cheese, meat and meat products. “Convenience” foods such as ready-made pizzas, soups and pasta are also high in salt.

The food industry, as well as small producers (bakers, butchers, etc.), are driven to lower the salt content in their products through the introduction of innovative practices in production.

Salt from the Alps is being presented alongside the Confederation in the Swiss pavilion because it represents the values ​​being promoted, in particular the attractiveness of Switzerland and its responsibility in the area of food.

One of the key messages carried by the salt of the Alps to Milan in 2015 will be a message of balance: a core value in healthy eating. Salt brings a touch of pleasure, essential for gastronomy, but it must be consumed in moderation. The advantages of a reduced salt diet are many: reducing your consumption of salt lowers blood pressure and thus reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular physical activity, limiting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and a balanced diet of fruit and vegetables all enhance the hypotensive effect of a low-salt diet.

The Saline de Bex saltworks are an important tourist destination, receiving more than 70,000 visitors each year. Salt is also one of the rare commodities found on Swiss territory and as such is part of the country’s national heritage.

In terms of responsibility, the Saline de Bex has exemplary ecological credentials. The white gold that has been present in the Alps for 200 million years has been extracted at Bex for the past 500 years using an environmentally responsible process.

...

More

COFFEE

Coffee from the Swiss agri-food industry is a prime example of innovation, as is the commitment of the public and private sectors which aim to ensure sustainability throughout the value chain of the sector, all the way from the plant to the coffee cup.

Swiss foreign trade statistics show that coffee has become the country’s top food product export, outstripping exports of chocolate and cheese by a long way.

Through its Nescafé project, Nestlé helps around 400,000 farmers in 14 countries worldwide, improving their quality of life and working conditions. It is also working constantly to ensure that the environmental footprint is reduced.

In Vietnam, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), in collaboration with the government and small producers, is working to reduce water consumption in the production of coffee.

Furthermore, in many countries of the world the SDC supports and promotes family-run farms to ensure they have secure access to land, and improved access to knowledge and to the market so that they can live a life free from hunger or poverty.

...

More

APPLE

The apple rings come from traditional tall trees in Swiss orchards and represent biodiversity, the ability to diversify and the central role of agriculture in protecting the landscape. Apples are an essential part of a healthy and natural diet.

Most of the apple rings come from Jonagold apples – tall apple trees producing organic fruit which accounts for 10% of total output annually.

After the coffee tower – iconic product of the Swiss agri-food industry – comes the apple tower, showing the importance of agriculture in Switzerland. The apple also takes us back to the roots of Swiss history and the values of freedom embodied by William Tell.

Some numbers:

In Switzerland there are 2.3 million tall trees and there are 30,000 hectares planted with fruit trees.

50 tonnes of dried apples from the last few years’ harvests will fill the tower of apples.

420,000 sample bags for the tower will be prepared with the help of the Egnach & Mansio foundation workshops for people with disabilities.

...

More

WATER

The theme of water as a vital resource is the central focus of the Swiss pavilion and represents a sustainable and responsible Switzerland.

The Gotthard massif is also called the “water tower of Europe”. In fact it is the source of four major European rivers: the Reuss, the Rhine, the Rhone and the Ticino, crossing and nourishing Europe before emptying into the North Sea and the Mediterranean. The Gotthard cantons (Graubünden, Ticino, Uri and Valais), the cradle of the Swiss Confederation, are veritable reservoirs for most of the countries of our continent.

82% of the Swiss water footprint is attributable to the consumption of water in foreign countries. Switzerland’s commitment to the protection, treatment and distribution of this resource is very strong: about CHF 200 million are invested annually by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs to enhance the value of water in economic activities and promote cross-border cooperation in the management of water resources at the international level.

The drinking water in one of the four towers is from the local water table and carries a message of awareness on the precious nature of this rare and limited resource, in Switzerland and around the world.

The tower is filled with goblets displaying a picture of the water cycle with a supporting slogan. Visitors will be able to help themselves to drinking water from the tower and then reuse the goblets elsewhere at Expo 2015 or at home.

This tower will show the general public the challenges linked to sustainable water management, one of the major challenges facing humankind in the 21st century.

The main messages are to remind us that water is a precious, vital resource and at the same time to show the various initiatives going on in the public and private sectors to ensure a durable and sustainable supply.

Water is the basis of all life.

...

More

SALT

Salt taken from under the ground in Switzerland is an essential element in human nutrition as well as for industrial production. This tower allows us to show the general public the various initiatives that aim to reduce the excessive consumption of salt in industrialised countries and reduce nutritional deficiencies among populations of developing countries.

Currently salt consumption in Switzerland and throughout the rest of Europe is around 10g per day: this figure represents about twice the daily intake of 5g recommended by the WHO. Most of the salt that we consume comes from processed foods such as bread, cheese, meat and meat products. “Convenience” foods such as ready-made pizzas, soups and pasta are also high in salt.

The food industry, as well as small producers (bakers, butchers, etc.), are driven to lower the salt content in their products through the introduction of innovative practices in production.

Salt from the Alps is being presented alongside the Confederation in the Swiss pavilion because it represents the values ​​being promoted, in particular the attractiveness of Switzerland and its responsibility in the area of food.

One of the key messages carried by the salt of the Alps to Milan in 2015 will be a message of balance: a core value in healthy eating. Salt brings a touch of pleasure, essential for gastronomy, but it must be consumed in moderation. The advantages of a reduced salt diet are many: reducing your consumption of salt lowers blood pressure and thus reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular physical activity, limiting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and a balanced diet of fruit and vegetables all enhance the hypotensive effect of a low-salt diet.

The Saline de Bex saltworks are an important tourist destination, receiving more than 70,000 visitors each year. Salt is also one of the rare commodities found on Swiss territory and as such is part of the country’s national heritage.

In terms of responsibility, the Saline de Bex has exemplary ecological credentials. The white gold that has been present in the Alps for 200 million years has been extracted at Bex for the past 500 years using an environmentally responsible process.

...

More

The towers are the heart of the Swiss Pavilion. Visitors will be invited to discover Switzerland – the diversity of products and values which underlie the success of the Swiss approach – by engaging in a fun exploration of the towers. Switzerland wishes to take part in Expo 2015 as  an active, caring and socially responsible stakeholder in the area of food and sustainable development. 

The journey through the towers is guided by this leitmotif, thus prompting visitors to reflect – on the basis of their own personal experience – on the global availability of food and sustainable development throughout the food value chain. Visitors will be free to take away or consume any amount of the products. How much will be left for later visitors – and for how long – will be determined by the consumer behaviour and level of awareness of each visitor.

The products in the towers were selected on the basis of this general aim as well as of specific criteria, such as storage properties, sustainability, climate conditions, availability, and the products’ relevance in the Swiss agri-food industry.

The four products chosen for the towers (water, salt, coffee and apples) stand for a Switzerland which is sustainable, responsible, innovative and proud of its traditions. Coffee – from the Swiss agri-food industry – is a good example of the public and private sectors’ capacity for innovation and commitment to ensuring sustainability throughout the coffee value chain, from crop to cup. Coffee has become the main export food product, overtaking chocolate and cheese in terms of share in foreign trade. Apple rings – from different varieties of Swiss apple trees – represent biodiversity, the capacity for successful economic diversification and the key role played by agriculture in protecting the countryside, in addition to making a positive contribution to a healthy and natural diet. Salt – from underground salt deposits in Switzerland – is essential to nutrition and industrial production alike. The focus on this vital substance is intended to increase public awareness of the initiatives taken to reduce salt consumption, promote healthy living and improve the quality of life.

Water is a key component of the Swiss Pavilion. It is the overarching theme of the exhibition organised by the City of Zurich. The four Gotthard cantons will be presenting an exhibition relating to water. The water in the tower comes from the local aquifer, which feeds the Swiss Pavilion’s supply network. The main messages relating to the tower dedicated to the theme of water highlight the fact that water is a precious resource and are intended to serve as a basis for an open debate on the importance of securing a sustainable supply of water through public-private initiatives. After all, 783 million people worldwide have no access to drinking water and 2.5 billion people have no access to sanitation.

Once the world exhibition is over, the towers will be reused as urban greenhouses in several Swiss cities. Seventy-five per cent of the materials used for the Swiss Pavilion and related infrastructures can be recycled after the event.